Month: August 2015

Funding Update

Barometer marked to 5000 Flattened

Nolan

 

I have raised $3000.00 thus far as a result of the generosity of family and friends. Although I started with the lofty goal of raising $8000.00, I have been able to find a publishing company that can produce a beautiful publication for much less than I had originally anticipated. As a result, I have decreased the amount needed to complete the first stage of this project. I am hoping to raise an additional $1,300-$2000 so I can print 2000-3000 copies of the publication. The publication will be distributed to the public and Georgia legislators for free. Please consider making a tax deductible donation to this project. If you are unable to make a donation at this time please forward the link to my website or blog to those you know who may be interested in this cause.

There are many supports available in our community that enhance the quality of life for individuals living with developmental disabilities. Unfortunately, supports are costly and many families have limited budgets. With state and federal funding, persons with developmental disabilities can access a variety of services. The photo above features a four-year-old boy receiving therapeutic equine riding lessons at Stride Ahead (http://www.strideahead.org/StrideAhead/Mane_Page.html). Pam Smith, the head instructor is featured on the right. Therapeutic riding  at Stride Ahead provides individuals with a program that will “develop and strengthen muscle tone, core strength, coordination, and flexibility, as well as developing mental and emotional life skills such as focus, leadership, social skills, confidence, cooperation, and friendship.”

To make a tax deductible contribution to Real Stories, Real People visit the website at:

http://www.realstoriesrealpeople.org/donate/

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A Father’s Perspective

Bob

When you have a child or children with life-long disabilities, it changes the nature and indeed, the definition of child rearing in a profound and lasting way. Raising children becomes a decades long process, with tangible concerns moving well beyond the parent’s actual lifetime. Friendships are impacted. In the end, we navigate the path much more alone than do parents of typical children.

Bob (Mae’s dad)

Bob’s daughter Mae was featured in blog posts on July 19 and August 1, 2015 at https://realstoriesrealpeoplega.wordpress.com

 

 

Interview with Mae

Mae in red chair

Interview with Mae

Beate: Mae, would you please introduce yourself?

Mae: I’m Mae and I love to swim, go to movies, exercise and get massages. I am a kind person and I am very nice to be around.

B: Mae, can you talk about your disability and how it affects your life?

M: I have schizophrenia and autism.The medication (for schizophrenia) makes me hungry but I like to eat healthy. We all have things we need to work on but sometimes I forget about things and people have to tell me what to do instead of me taking the initiative.

B: You will be aging out of high school in November. Are you excited or nervous and what do you hope to be doing?

M: Probably get a job walking or training dogs or working with flowers. I’m excited to be going to job training.

B: Why is it important to you to get a job?

M: Because then if I can buy stuff I’ll be all set. I can buy my own furniture and food. If I can get money I’ll be prepared for the real life

B: When you are ready to move out of your Dad’s home what are your plans?

M: I want to live in a beautiful home with friends and have my own bedroom.

B: Do you think that you will need some support to live on your own?

M: I wil probably need support with hygiene like reminders to brush my teeth and hair and get showered. I know how to cook spaghetti and eggs.

B: Do you have a message that you would like to share with others?

M: That I hope to have a good life.