autism

Mae’s Story

Mae Rosen-9

Mae with her father and sister, Lena, who is also living with autism.

Through all these trials and tribulations, we are raising two girls who continue to be loving, kind, caring, and all around wonderful people who would befriend every person they meet, and certainly talk to anyone and everyone without discrimination or discernment. Their challenges are not due to anything they have done wrong or chosen to have…it’s all just an unforeseeable and unfortunate genetic abnormality. They rarely complain about the limitations they recognize in themselves and move through life with a sort of stumbling grace I envy. I am their father and I love them and hope we as parents can put things in place to assure reasonably full and meaningful lives for them.

– Bob (father to Mae and Lena)

To view Mae’s full story visit http://www.realstoriesrealpeople.org/mae/

Mae’s Job Training at Agnes Scott

Mae at AS

Mae works in the cafeteria at Agnes Scott College once a week through a job training program at her high school. Over 80% of adults with intellectual disabilities are not employed. Approximately 63% of people with disabilities who are unemployed want to work. The majority of special education students who age out of high school could be successful at working paid jobs in the community but supported employment is needed to ensure their success. Earning an income would steer these individuals away from a life of dependence and poverty. For every dollar invested in supported employment there is a return of $1.61.

Once Mae ages out of high school in November our focus will be on job training. Mae is very capable of working but she will need perhaps a year of social skills, community navigation and job training before she would be ready to be placed, then who knows how many months of job coaching? However, at some point I believe she will make a good employee and by working, she will begin to return Georgia’s investment in her. She has participated in a number of internship positions through her high school program and the common denominator is that she is a pleasure to work with so I am hopeful she will be able to find a position suitable for her, with time and help.

Bob (Mae’s father)

Interview with Mae

Mae in red chair

Interview with Mae

Beate: Mae, would you please introduce yourself?

Mae: I’m Mae and I love to swim, go to movies, exercise and get massages. I am a kind person and I am very nice to be around.

B: Mae, can you talk about your disability and how it affects your life?

M: I have schizophrenia and autism.The medication (for schizophrenia) makes me hungry but I like to eat healthy. We all have things we need to work on but sometimes I forget about things and people have to tell me what to do instead of me taking the initiative.

B: You will be aging out of high school in November. Are you excited or nervous and what do you hope to be doing?

M: Probably get a job walking or training dogs or working with flowers. I’m excited to be going to job training.

B: Why is it important to you to get a job?

M: Because then if I can buy stuff I’ll be all set. I can buy my own furniture and food. If I can get money I’ll be prepared for the real life

B: When you are ready to move out of your Dad’s home what are your plans?

M: I want to live in a beautiful home with friends and have my own bedroom.

B: Do you think that you will need some support to live on your own?

M: I wil probably need support with hygiene like reminders to brush my teeth and hair and get showered. I know how to cook spaghetti and eggs.

B: Do you have a message that you would like to share with others?

M: That I hope to have a good life.